Are Isolation Tanks Safe

What health or safety concerns should you have while floating in a tank?

By Jill Smith on August 2, 2019

Are you worried about the safety of using an isolation tank? Are you worried about drowning in the water or running out of oxygen while inside the tank? Well, fear not, as the regular use of an isolation tank, if used correctly, poses no significant health risks. Isolation tanks are very safe. A well maintained and cared for isolation tank is no more of a health hazard than is the bathtub in your house or apartment right now.

The water in your typical isolation tank is very shallow. Depending on the model you are using, the water depth is anywhere between 10 to 15 inches. Hardly deep enough to drown in! With that being said, make sure to keep your isolation tank in a safe location and inaccessible to small children. Common sense should be utilized at all times.

Claustrophobia is another commonly mentioned fear while using a tank. If this pertains to you, then you’re in luck. Claustrophobia was one of my biggest fears before using a tank. I actually used my tank with the door open for the first few times until I became comfortable with the idea of isolating myself. Just remember that the reason you are using the tank is to clear your mind and alleviate your fears, worries, and concerns. If you can use the isolation tank as a method to rid yourself of even one of those fears, worries, or concerns, then you’ve won.

Another safety concern I have heard is the fear of using a tank during pregnancy. You should look at tank use during pregnancy in a similar light as lying in your bathtub during pregnancy. Often times, pregnant women will comment on how relaxed their baby is during their time floating in the tank. This makes sense, as your baby can read your body. If you are 100% relaxed while in the tank, your baby will enjoy the relaxation, just as you will.

As always, make sure to practice good hygiene before and after tank use. You should always use the restroom and shower before entering the tank. Also remember to shower after your time in the tank. You should not use the tank if you have any open wounds, as the salt will likely cause pain. Floating should be a personal experience, so there should only be one occupant at a time using the isolation tank.

If you follow this guide, and use good common sense, you should have an ideal and enjoyable experience in any isolation tank. If you have any additional questions regarding your health and safety, please contact your doctor or personal physician. You should never partake in any activity where you are not 100% comfortable and knowledgeable about what you are doing.